Buy second-hand and rent to make your life easier and sustainable

An essential fundamental of the zero-waste movement is reusing and repurposing things as much as possible before throwing them away. We want to extend the life of something because their previous owners no longer need them doesn't necessarily mean they are useless or broken.



One man's trash is another man's treasure; you can find great items for your home with great discounts; this concept doesn't only apply t material things but also services, such as why buy a formal tuxedo dress when you wear it once or twice.


Let's start by reducing


I previously talked about the 4 Rs of the zero-waste movement. I want to focus now on reducing and reusing.



Both concepts are simple: reduce impulse purchases as much as possible; when you plan on buying anything, ask yourself if you need it or where it will be stored in your home.


For smarter minimalist ways to purchase, check out these questions to shop like a minimalist.


At home, check out your wardrobe, vanity, pantry, or deposit. Ask yourself if you truly need all those knick-knacks or clothes in there, or are they taking up space.



Check out those "what if?" items; we all have those just in case things; how long is this just in a case lasting? 6 months? over a year? Unless they are valuable items like tools, you should consider selling or donating them.


Resist impulse buying temptations; the easiest way is to avoid shopping spots unless necessary; the same applies to online browsing, only search for deals or the stuff you want when you need something.



Always remember that there are zero-waste alternatives to cover any need. For example, you can rent instead of buying, especially for things you might use once every blue moon, think of objects like carpet cleaners, formal outfits, or even a lawnmower.


Reuse as much as possible


The other R in this movement implies rejecting the concept of using and tossing. Instead, try to reuse something for as long as you can.


A long list of reusable items is born from this idea, such as reusable coffee filters and reusable k-cups, washable paper towels, reusable kitchen sponges, shopping bags, or silicone straws.


You can check more smart reusable kitchen swaps here.


For pretty much every item, there is a reusable alternative. For this reason, second-hand stores are so popular nowadays.



Consider renting or buying second hand first


The concept of buying second-hand stuff applies to many things, including substantial ticket items such as furniture.


The main benefit of buying second-hand is getting some of the best deals possible. You can find incredible-looking outfits and accessories like shoes or bags for dirt-cheap; some great finds include vintage items that you will never see at a regular retail store. Besides, for some people hunting for the perfect clothes is almost like a hobby.



When it comes to appliances and furniture, there are so many online platforms to find them or hunt for them at flea markets.


I find that a minimalist home can take advantage of second-hand furniture.

Most people think of an all-white home when they want to create a minimalist design, and although it is a possible alternative, it is not the only way.


You can customize your house to match your style while keeping a minimal aesthetic. Instead of buying an entire matching room from Ikea, mix and match items, like a new bed with second-hand nightstands and dresser.



You will save a lot of money and create a unique looking home, and nobody wants to live in a retail magazine, avoid at all costs buying an entire catalog; exactly matching furniture is a big no-no in most rooms.


What are some of the best online platforms to buy second-hand?


The second-hand trend is gaining popularity; you can find websites specializing in specific categories or work as a general store. Here are some great websites to buy or sell your stuff.



eBay


You can score some fantastic deals here, the number one spot to sell and buy used things, from clothes to video games.


ThredUp


It focuses primarily on women's clothes; you can find some unique pieces, the product description is precise, plus if something doesn't fit, you have the option to return it, and their packaging is plastic-free!



Swap


A cheaper alternative to ThredUp and more categories that include men, don't forget to stop by their clearance section for some crazy discounts.


Etsy


Focused more on vintage items, but you can also find some fantastic artisan-crafted items.


Poshmark


It is a great spot to buy second-hand, but you can't return items, so you have to be careful when purchasing; always ask the seller and keep in mind sizes; you can also request plastic-free packaging.


Do you know any other website to buy/sell second-hand or to rent things or services? Make sure to share them in the comment section below.


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